Graduate Courses

Graduate courses are listed by year, from Fall through Spring quarters.

2017-2018

Fall 2017

ENGL 236 | The History and Making of Print

This is a theoretical, critical, and practical course in print, taught collaboratively by Patricia Fumerton, Department of English, and Harry Reese, Department of Art and Co-Director of Book Arts, CCS. It moves from a short theory and history of print to focus on the practical making of print, from papermaking, to engaging with different typefaces, and setting and printing type. In the second half of the course, students will print a page from an author or genre that is of special interest to their field of study and write a critical paper (6-10 pp.) about how their experience in making their printed artifact produces and interacts with interpretation of the author/field they are focusing on. All students will also participate in a last day display and critique of their made artifact. This course is part of the “maker” movement in the humanities.

Admission to the course is by permission of the instructors. The course will be limited to 6 English and Art graduate students and 6 undergraduates, with priority given to CCS undergrads and then English. Total maximum enrollment for the course: 12 students. Graduate students may apply to the Graduate Committee to have the course count toward the fulfillment of whatever field they focus on in their special project.

2016-2017

Spring 2017

ENGL 232 | Early Modern Political Thought

Building on last year’s ENGL 231, “Modernity and Early Modernity,” this iteration of ENGL 231 explores the modernity of early modern political thought as it appears in early modern English art and philosophy.  The seminar will work to better understand our own nominally “modern” political settlement by exploring its central categories — citizenship, subjection, representation, secularity, popularity — and by asking how these categories were operating between the end of the sixteenth century and the end of the seventeenth century, or at the moment when the modern world is often said to “emerge” in England.  To this end, we will explore the work of republican and proto-republican philosophers (Hobbes, Bacon, Machiavelli, Buchanan), the work of propagandists (Charles I, Milton), and the work of politically sophisticated artists (Shakespeare, Marlowe, Cavendish, Dekker, Lanyer).  The seminar will also engage with current debates around periodization, democracy, authority, consent, and dissent.

Winter 2017

ENGL 236 | Ephemera, 1550 to Present

Riding the recent wave of studies in ephemera that has swept across humanities disciplines as an extension of the turn to the object as both a thing and a moment in time, this course will study a selection of ephemera from 1550 to the present. The objects of study are necessarily selectively and subjectively chosen and roughly take us from older to newer forms of ephemera: including, tracts and libels; court masques; broadside ballads; woodcuts and comic strips; newspapers (guest speaker, Rachael King); miscellanies, excerpts, and marginalia (guest speaker: Arthur Marotti); extra-illustrated books (this class includes a trip to the Huntington Library to view some of its famed collection of such books, with guest speaker Lori Anne Ferrell); games, focusing on abandonware and app stores (guest speaker, Jeremy Douglass), and the transitory nature of the world wide web, or “404: Curating Networks” (guest speaker, Alan Liu).

An ongoing question the course will pursue is “what are ephemera?” The Ephemera Project at Rice University defines ephemera as “detritus or garbage that people produce without intending it to survive the moment,” http://chaocenter.rice.edu/ephemera/about.aspx (link is external). Would you agree? What about recycling? What role do hobbyists and collectors play in such a definition and our study of ephemera? Why even produce let alone collect “detritus”? Why do we as cultural literary critics care about the ephemera of any historical period?

FRENCH 232B | Female Patronage in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance: Translation, Adaptation and the Illustrated Book

The shifting shapes, design and dynamics of books and their function in the dissemination of meaning and in the redefinition of authorship, patronage and bookmaking during the transition from manuscript to print have inspired researchers over the last several decades.  To better understand the socio-political dynamics of literary creation and transmission and the relationship between a book’s materiality and its content, this graduate seminar will concentrate on the role of female patronage and gift-giving in medieval and Renaissance bookmaking, on the illustrated book as the artistic object shaped and designed with women in mind, and on translation and adaptation as the mode of literary expression that was at once tailored to this female readership and embodied in the book as cultural artifact.  Seminars will focus on topics such as the translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Heroides in France, the tradition of the Romance of the Rose, and the enduring influence of Boccaccio’s De claris mulieribus, with close examination – thanks to online technology — of the very books written by or for women: those owned by collectors (such as Louise of Savoie and Margaret of Austria), those dedicated to European queens and other nobles (such as Charlotte of Savoie and Anne of Brittany), and those containing well-known texts adapted or translated by female writers (such as Christine de Pizan and Anne de Graville).

2015-2016

Spring 2016

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Modernity and Early Modernity
Please *click here* to access the syllabus.

Both intellectually and institutionally, our discipline relies on periodization when dealing with history, philosophy, and art, assuming that the historical period wields substantial interpretive or explanatory power. Taking the period as an object of study rather than an enabling fiction, however, “Modernity and Early Modernity” explores the most influential periodizing assumption in the history of Western thought: that “we” became “modern” somewhere between the 14th and 18th centuries. To explore this imagined historical breach, we will probe the “early modern,” an epoch marked by its fraught relationship to the primary intellectual categories through which Western histories are often imagined. Exploring the impossible relationship between the medieval and the modern that “early modernity” posits, we will work not only to identify the character of early modernity but also to identify the various ways that the category forecloses our understanding of the period under consideration. In doing so, we will regularly ask two key questions posed by Dipesh Chakrabarty in Habitations of Modernity: “Can the designation of something or some group as non- or premodern ever be anything but a gesture of the powerful?” What do we do when we characterize those people “whose life practices constantly challenge our ‘modern’ distinctions between the secular and the sacred, between the feudal and the capitalist, between the nonrational and the rational?”

As implied by Chakrabarty’s questions, the character of modernity is often identified in shifting terms that are imagined to map readily onto one another, as if secular, democratic politics, scientific rationalism, and capitalism are necessarily of a piece. Throughout the course, we will consider these terms individually, in relation to one another, and in terms of their presumed relationship to modernity. To facilitate this project, each week will be dedicated to a single key coordinate in the story told about modernity and the early modern. After the first week during which we will discuss the various histories enabled and foreclosed by stories of modernity, we will explore modern political economy at the dawn of capitalism in England, the various forms of political organization supported and challenged by modern forms of republicanism, and the three forms of social organization most often identified with modernity: the metropolis, the Westphalian nation state, and the “Globe of Nations.” After dealing with questions of political and economic organization, we will explore the implications of scientific and geographical exploration in discussions of modernity and early modernity. We will finish with Hamlet.

Fall 2015

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Shakespeare and Phenomenology
Inspired by the Early Modern Center’s 2015-16 theme, “The Phenomenology of Playing,” this course will explore phenomenology in relation to Shakespeare and his theater.  Embracing the enabling limits of the quarter system, we will read only four of Shakespeare’s plays – Measure for Measure, Macbeth, The Winter’s Tale, and King Lear – but we will read them well, devoting significant time to each play.  Our discussion of phenomenology will extend from the big three of phenomenology’s heyday – Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty – to the emergent field of historical phenomenology as articulated by early modern critics like Bruce Smith and Julia Reinhard Lupton.  In our conversations about phenomenology’s attempt to grasp or account for lived experience, we will touch on the phenomenologically-inflected thought of Arendt and Levinas, as well as contemporary attempts to rethink the phenomenological project in relation to body, emotion, and mind.  We will discuss topics ranging from the senses and theatrical experience to affective engagement and affordance theory, from cognitive ecologies and extended mind to ethical experience and the demands of community.

 


2014-2015

Spring 2015

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Economic Thought, Early Modern Texts
In this course we will cherry-pick from 2500 years of economic thought in order to consider key economic issues in relation to the literature of early modern England.  In our inquiry, we will touch on a variety of thinkers, ranging from Aristotle and Seneca to Locke and Marx, from Nietzsche and Simmel to Graeber and Massumi.  As the above list suggests, our foray into economic thought will be unapologetically transhistorical.  At the same time, we will attend to the ways in which tracing a genealogy of modern economic concepts transports us to unexpected places in the premodern discursive landscape: moral philosophy, theology, natural history.  In our discussions, we will tackle traditional economic concepts like property, debt, labor, and value, but we will also reflect on imaginative world-building, affective epistemologies, and non-human economies.  We will consider early modern literary texts such as More’s Utopia, book two of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, Jonson’s Volpone, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, and Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe as we discuss topics ranging from utopian desire and the disavowal of the economic to affective economies and instrumental reason, from theories of value and money to economic precarity and the anthropology of debt.

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Expanded Epistolary Literature
Jürgen Habermas has argued that the epistle is the preeminently private genre, a quasi-diary in which “the individual unfolded himself in his subjectivity.” Jacques Derrida, meanwhile, has described the letter as “not a genre but all genres, literature itself.” As these influential accounts show, letters can be hard to define; they appear to be both historically specific and universal, both constraining and versatile. While the letter has a long history in literature, beginning at least with Ovid’s Heroides, it was with the expansion and systematization of state postal systems that this old genre exploded into the print public sphere. Almost as soon as there were newspapers, people began writing to their editors, and the first novels also structured themselves as series of letters between characters. This course focuses on the theme of correspondence “examining both fictional and authentic letters” as it became a key basis of literary production for philosophers, historians, journalists, novelists, biographers, and academics in the modern period. Is the letter public or private? Is it a democratic or exclusive genre? And why have such forms of communication proved central to moments of intellectual and disciplinary change? By reading a variety of epistolary genres as well as adopting the epistolary form for some of our critical responses, we will investigate the impact of the letter on concepts of literature, originality, and the self.

Winter 2015

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Politics

Fall 2014

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Sequels and Series – Publishing “The Making of a Broadside Ballad”
This course is designed as a sequel or extension of the course I taught last year in Winter ’14 on early modern ballad culture and popular print. As the students and I explored making ballads in all their materiality, from ourselves making paper broadside sheets in UCSB’s Art Studio, to learning the distinctive tricks that go into ballad writing, to fitting tunes to such texts (with the help of EBBA’s ethnomusicologists), to setting type and printing our own self-created ballads on our own self-created paper at the UC Riverside Print Shop, the entire class (instructor included) underwent a radical discovery. In a major way we came to understand that so much that is involved in the “making” of a printed artifact–especially of a single ballad sheet of printed, illustrated, and (as indicated in the printed tune title) sung text–influences our perception of what ballads “are” and how they would have been received in their own time. So much did our “makings” change our “interpretations,” that we realized we had in a fresh and important way redefined the methods of research on print and material culture. We thus decided to publish our discoveries in a six-issue special series of the Early Modern Center’s emcImprint (a new refereed, online journal produced by the EMC). Co-editing these special issues with myself are Professor Andrew Griffin and Dr. Carl Stahmer (EBBA Associate Director).

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Reality and the Novel
For too long we have emphasized Literature’s power to figure, to trope and to construct fantasy. Critics and readers of novels have understood realism as a technique of creating a virtual reality that is not (real). But this ignores the novel’s hold upon reality. It is time to strip the quotes that the linguistic turn in literary studies has put around reality. Only then can we recover how novel writers used fiction to investigate reality. (c.f. Bruno Latour, An Inquiry Into the Modes of Existence) But what, you might well ask, do you mean by reality? That is always a difficult question and must be handled with care. In reading a series of important novels, written between 1605 and 1872, we will read some of the literary theorists of this question (Eric Auerbach; Ian Watt, Bruno Latour). But our main attention will be directed as tracing the strategies by which six writers use novelistic narrative to investigate some aspect of reality. In Don Quixote, Cervantes thematicizes the power of novel-induced belief to displace non-novelistic reality. In Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina the power of fantasy collides with the embodied power of the heroines all too real body. In writing Joseph Andrews “written in imitation of the Manner of Cervantes”, Henry Fielding uses Cervantes’ style to challenge the first person bias and high moral seriousness of Richardson’s Pamela. Sterne’s Tristram Shandy embeds reality in the mental associations that are both free and constrained. In Oliver Twist, Dickens incorporates the dialects and ideolects of London to deliver a withering—and he insists, all too real—exposé of the fate of the orphan in industrializing England. In George Eliot’s “study of provincial life,” the interdependence of the lives, places, intentions and actions in Middlemarch figures reality as a social system as complex as those conceptualized by classics of 19th century sociology (Compt, Weber, Marx).

  1. Miguel de Cervantes: The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, Part I, 1605. (week 1-2) Please use one of the complete Samuel Putnam translations.
  2. Eliza Haywood, Fantomina, 1725 and Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews: Written in Imitation of the Manner of Cervantes [Oxford World Classic, ed. By Douglas Brooks-Davies] (week 3)
  3. Lawrence Sterne: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, 1759 [Norton Critical Edition is recommended, ed. By Howard Anderson] (week 4-5)
  4. Charles Dickens: Oliver Twist: the Parish Boy’s Progress, 1838 [Dover Thrift Edition] (week 6)
  5. George Eliot: Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life, 1871-72 [Penguin Classic] (week 7-9)

Requirements: one seminar presentation (on literary text), one seminar presentation (on critical text) and a final term paper. Of course, you must also enjoy reading!

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Writing Early Modern Nature

Challenging the truism that “Enlightenment science” divided humans from the natural world, this course traces an early-modern history of environmentalism and environmental ethics, mostly in British contexts. We will explore ethical, historical, aesthetic, scientific, ethnographic, and political questions in a variety of literary genres – along the way engaging critical perspectives from current environmental ethicists/ecophilosophers, literary ecocritics, and post-colonial theorists.

– What did “nature” mean to Europeans in the 17th and 18th centuries, and how was “nature” valued (using “value” in both the affective and economic senses)?
– How did writers imagine human relations with non-human others, and what literary genres did they see as appropriate for exploring these?
– How did Europeans see “nature” as different in the stories they set in circum-Caribbean colonized outposts?
– What did (does) it mean to “speak for” nature?

Our last readings for the quarter will look at how and why later writers have returned to 18th-c. accounts of human/non-human relations.

 

 


2013-2014

Fall 2013

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Ballad of the Dissertation
This three-quarter colloquium involves a series of 9 mostly Skype lectures by graduate students and junior scholars of English Literature and History who have incorporated broadside ballads from the 16th to the 19th centuries into their dissertations. Presentations will be informal and designed to answer questions that address generally the challenges of defining the topic and the parameters of a dissertation as well as how introducing popular print changes, enhances or productively “disturbs” one’s perspective. Some presenters who have already filed their dissertations will further address strategies for turning a dissertation into a publishable book.

ENGL 595GE | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Genres of the Long Enlightenment, their Origins and Destinations
For the sake of this colloquium, we’ll use a very broad definition of “genre.” Derived from the French word genre, meaning “kind”, genre came to denote “a particular style or category of work or literary composition, characterized by a particular form, style, or purpose.” (OED) Although the term ‘genre’ was most widely applied to imaginative literary works, for analytical purposes we’ll apply it to the broad Renaissance and Enlightenment sense of literature, as including all the forms of letters and writing for the sake of learning. We focus most of our study upon the long 18th century (1660-1820) because the expansion of print and trade and the institution of literary criticism made this a period when old genres were collected and studied, and new genres and formats of writing were invented and developed.

So for our study, we will select from an open set of genres: genres related to the advancement of knowledge, from the journal article reporting experimental findings to dictionaries and encyclopedia; newspapers and magazines; ballads and ballad collections; systems and essays; musical theater; natural histories; and a host of genres of a more literary kind, from epic, mock epic and georgic to the sentimental and gothic novel. We hope that by ranging across this very broad set of genres we will make headway with questions of historical and theoretical interest: what is a ‘genre’? what role does it play in networking authors and readers and getting them to share common protocols for reading? Is there a law for each genre? Or is it the role of genre to encourage violations of these implicit laws (pace Derrida)? What is the knowledge or entertainment function of a particular genre? How does it enable new networking and communication? How do they stimulate the formation of new communities of reading?

Topics and discussion leaders (UCSB faculty and grad students and selected visitors) – as of now “topics” listed are possible but not yet firm. The rest is set.

Fall 2013:

Warner: on classical literary genres (e.g. Homer or Horace translated by Pope)
Nov 1: Anne Maurseth, UCSB French, The Genres of Enlightenment Chance in Mathematics, Philosophy and Fiction
November 15: Arthur Morotti, Wayne State University, Anthologies
December 6: Elisa Tamarkan, “Relevance and the Newspaper”

Winter 2014

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: The Makings of Popular Media – Broadside Ballads, 1500-1800
This course will study the evolving culture of the most published and most read of literary forms in early modern England: the broadside ballad. The goal is to understand the printed ballad within its changing aesthetic and historical contexts. In each class, we will read a sampling of ballads from the period in light of critical works that address the following topics: definition (what is a ballad?), formal features (paper and ink; woodcut illustrations), production and dissemination (authors, printers/publishers, and peddlers/chapmen), orality (music and performance), collectors and collecting processes (with a focus on the Crawford collection), and making a digital ballad archive. The course will be in many ways “hands on.” We will make paper as it was made in the 16th and 17th centuries at the UCSB Art Studio, work a printing press at UC Riverside, handle original broadside ballads and woodcuts at the Huntington Library, and both transcribe and make facsimile transcriptions for the English Broadside Ballad Archive in the EMC.

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Ballad of the Dissertation
This three-quarter colloquium involves a series of 9 mostly Skype lectures by graduate students and junior scholars of English Literature and History who have incorporated broadside ballads from the 16th to the 19th centuries into their dissertations. Presentations will be informal and designed to answer questions that address generally the challenges of defining the topic and the parameters of a dissertation as well as how introducing popular print changes, enhances or productively “disturbs” one’s perspective. Some presenters who have already filed their dissertations will further address strategies for turning a dissertation into a publishable book.

ENGL 595GE | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Genres of the Long Enlightenment, their Origins and Destinations
For the sake of this colloquium, we’ll use a very broad definition of “genre.” Derived from the French word genre, meaning “kind”, genre came to denote “a particular style or category of work or literary composition, characterized by a particular form, style, or purpose.” (OED) Although the term ‘genre’ was most widely applied to imaginative literary works, for analytical purposes we’ll apply it to the broad Renaissance and Enlightenment sense of literature, as including all the forms of letters and writing for the sake of learning. We focus most of our study upon the long 18th century (1660-1820) because the expansion of print and trade and the institution of literary criticism made this a period when old genres were collected and studied, and new genres and formats of writing were invented and developed.

So for our study, we will select from an open set of genres: genres related to the advancement of knowledge, from the journal article reporting experimental findings to dictionaries and encyclopedia; newspapers and magazines; ballads and ballad collections; systems and essays; musical theater; natural histories; and a host of genres of a more literary kind, from epic, mock epic and georgic to the sentimental and gothic novel. We hope that by ranging across this very broad set of genres we will make headway with questions of historical and theoretical interest: what is a ‘genre’? what role does it play in networking authors and readers and getting them to share common protocols for reading? Is there a law for each genre? Or is it the role of genre to encourage violations of these implicit laws (pace Derrida)? What is the knowledge or entertainment function of a particular genre? How does it enable new networking and communication? How do they stimulate the formation of new communities of reading?

Topics and discussion leaders (UCSB faculty and grad students and selected visitors) – as of now “topics” listed are possible but not yet firm. The rest is set.

Winter 2014:

Warner: on the theory of genre (Derrida and others)
February 14: Elizabeth Cook, UCSB, English “Natural History and Gilbert White”
February 28: Jim Kearney, UCSB, English, “On the Romance”
Topic: Long 18th century collection, curation and criticism of the Renaissance ballad: Pepys, Addison, Gay, Percy, etc.
Jim Kearney & team: on the romance

Spring 2014

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Ballad of the Dissertation
This three-quarter colloquium involves a series of 9 mostly Skype lectures by graduate students and junior scholars of English Literature and History who have incorporated broadside ballads from the 16th to the 19th centuries into their dissertations. Presentations will be informal and designed to answer questions that address generally the challenges of defining the topic and the parameters of a dissertation as well as how introducing popular print changes, enhances or productively “disturbs” one’s perspective. Some presenters who have already filed their dissertations will further address strategies for turning a dissertation into a publishable book.

ENGL 595GE | Special Graduate Colloquium: The Genres of the Long Enlightenment, their Origins and Destinations
For the sake of this colloquium, we’ll use a very broad definition of “genre.” Derived from the French word genre, meaning “kind”, genre came to denote “a particular style or category of work or literary composition, characterized by a particular form, style, or purpose.” (OED) Although the term ‘genre’ was most widely applied to imaginative literary works, for analytical purposes we’ll apply it to the broad Renaissance and Enlightenment sense of literature, as including all the forms of letters and writing for the sake of learning. We focus most of our study upon the long 18th century (1660-1820) because the expansion of print and trade and the institution of literary criticism made this a period when old genres were collected and studied, and new genres and formats of writing were invented and developed.

So for our study, we will select from an open set of genres: genres related to the advancement of knowledge, from the journal article reporting experimental findings to dictionaries and encyclopedia; newspapers and magazines; ballads and ballad collections; systems and essays; musical theater; natural histories; and a host of genres of a more literary kind, from epic, mock epic and georgic to the sentimental and gothic novel. We hope that by ranging across this very broad set of genres we will make headway with questions of historical and theoretical interest: what is a ‘genre’? what role does it play in networking authors and readers and getting them to share common protocols for reading? Is there a law for each genre? Or is it the role of genre to encourage violations of these implicit laws (pace Derrida)? What is the knowledge or entertainment function of a particular genre? How does it enable new networking and communication? How do they stimulate the formation of new communities of reading?

Topics and discussion leaders (UCSB faculty and grad students and selected visitors) – as of now “topics” listed are possible but not yet firm. The rest is set.

Spring 2014:

Warner: examples of the morphing and plasticity of genre (e.g. in the ‘rise of the novel,’ the long history of the newspaper)
Topic: The invention of the genre of the gothic: from Walpole to Lewis’s The Monk
May 9: Deidre Lynch, U. of Toronto, The Commonplace Book (or the Essay)


2012-2013

Fall 2012

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Early Modern Risk
Inspired by the “Speculative Risk” programming of last year, this course will pursue the topic of risk in early modern England. In most contemporary discussions of the topic, risk is correlated with modernity. In this course we will address the emergence of some modern conceptions of risk in early modern economic practice and political theory. We will also explore premodern cognates to the notion of risk in concepts like chance and hazard, contingency and calculation, uncertainty and exposure to loss. In our inquiry into early modern risk, we will read More’s Utopia, Bacon’s New Atlantis, book two of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, and Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice and The Winter’s Tale. In the course of our conversation we will also touch on the thought of Aristotle, Augustine, Luther, Hobbes, Blumenberg, Derrida, and Butler as we discuss topics ranging from utopian desire and societal engineering to the rise of speculative capitalism and insurance, from the dangers of maritime trade and metaphors of shipwreck to moral philosophy and the technologies of the self, from the hazards of transformative reading and religious conversion to hospitality, affective calculation, and the madness of decision.

Spring 2013

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Shakespeare, Marlowe, & Early Modern Political Thought


2011-2012

Fall 2011

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Some Shakespeare, Some Theory

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Jane Austen and the Invention of the “Modern” English Novel
In the past few decades, scholars have begun to appreciate the pivotal role of Jane Austen in the invention of the ‘modern’ novel. Between the 18th century ‘rise’ of the novel to a newly influential form of print entertainment and the literary hegemony that the novel achieved in the 19th and 20th centuries, there come the innovations of Jane Austen’s six novels: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Persuasion.

How can we overcome our over-familiarity with Austen? My first strategy in this course is to read ‘all’ of Jane Austen: her six novels, as well as the most significant juvenilia and letters. We can defamiliarize this corpus in other ways: 1) By studying her language: her characteristic diction and rhetoric; her narrative technique (free indirect discourse), her tone (detachment, sympathy), her generic blends (satire & sentiment), and her style (irony, understatement, etc.); 2) by contrasting her novels to some of those written before and after; 3) by tracing the connections between her novels and the complex and heterogeneous network out of which they emerged: the gentry estates of the ‘home’ counties of England, the private oral reading of the Austen family, the business of early 19th century publication and criticism, etc.; 4) by developing an historical analysis of the distinctive fascination her books have excited in avowed fans (i.e. ‘the Janeites’) as well as modern critics.

What is it that makes a Jane Austen novel distinctive? Why have her novels come to appear ‘classic’ and normative for novels that would be ‘realistic’ or ‘English’? How might we visualize her novels as communication systems? How, in short, might we do an actor-network theory analysis of all that unfolds under the name ‘Jane Austen’?
Requirements: 2 short oral presentations to the seminar and one seminar term paper. Auditors are welcome.

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project

Winter 2012

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Early Modern Women

ENGL 231 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Augustan Poetry and the Public Sphere

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project

Spring 2012

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Renaissance Drama and Historiography

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Milton

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project


2010-2011

Fall 2010

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Belonging, c. 1600
This course explores the ideas of citizenship, belonging, subjection, and solidarity through which early modern communities were constituted. We will read a mix of literary, dramatic, historiographical, and philosophical texts in order to negotiate the historically specific rings of inclusion or exclusion through which community and belonging were made understandable, visible, and possible. While such rings of inclusion are non-concentric – often overlapping, often in contest – the course will move heuristically from largest to smallest wherever such distinctions make sense. Specifically, our readings move from a cosmopolitical Christendom to homo clausus (a community of one) while addressing ideas of sovereignty, the kingdom, the nation, the polis, and the city. From here we will explore de-territorialized forms of belonging or solidarity such as “The City of Ladies,” the family unit, and the allegiance between friends. To provide a useful through-line and centre for our discussions, the course is both Shakespeare-heavy and drama-heavy.

Some Key Concepts: the territorialization or deterritorialization of community; friendship; “The City of Women”; states, nations, cities; sovereignty, consent, and “the people”; ethnic nationalities; the socially constitutive power of spaces and places; “coupling” and domesticity; community networks; common causes; “the public sphere”; isolation and loneliness.

If you’d like a copy of the syllabus, email Andrew Griffin: griffin@english.ucsb.edu (link sends e-mail)

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project

Winter 2011

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Popular Print, Ballad Culture, and the Roxburghe Archive

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project

Spring 2011

ENGL 231 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Novel in the History of Mediation, 1740-1840
This course will explore the rise of the novel into importance that is both popular (as a form of entertainment) and aesthetic (as a form of literature). We will read influential theories and histories of the novel (Bakhtin, Benjamin, Watt) as well as more recent reinterpretations of the novel through gender (Armstrong), world literature (Moretti), narrative form (Dorrit Kohn), the material text, and new cognitive approaches (Zunshine). What makes this course different: rather than assuming that we know what the novel genre “is” – for example, a literary genre to be put along side lyric and drama – we will approach the novel through the history of mediation that gave it a habitation and a form. My understanding of “mediation” is very capacious: it includes infrastructure (post, coach, railroad), formats (familiar letters, newspapers, magazines), genres (critical reviews, ‘histories,’ gothic, science fiction, etc.), associational practices (circulating libraries, reading circles, schools, public readings), and the protocols (of publicity, access, copyright, etc) that inflect these other mediations. To test the various ways of understanding the novel, we will read a very wide range of novels written by Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Austen, Shelly and Dickens.

ENGL 595BP | Special Graduate Colloquium: Ballad Project


2009-2010

Fall 2009

ENGL 236 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Shakespearean Romance


2008-2009

Fall 2008

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Gift, Commodity, Fetish: Imagined Economies in Early Modern English

Winter 2009

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Milton and Ecology

Spring 2009

EMCC | Ballad Project
Trains students in the use of Early Modern Center databases and courses; web page design; colloquia and conference organization. Includes an exploration of research facilities both on and off campus.

EMCC
The EMC Colloquium is an ongoing resource for graduate students and faculty with early modern interests, where they present work in progress, such as dissertation chapters and conference papers, as well as workshop fields lists, prospectuses, job letters and talks, and so forth.


2007-2008

Fall 2007

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Poetry and the Public, 1650-1750
This seminar examines the public roles of poetry in Great Britain from just before the Restoration through the first half of the 18th century. In eighteenth-c. studies, interest in print culture and/or the public sphere is often associated with accounts of the “rise of the novel”; this course attends to an influential form of literary production not addressed by that critical perspective. The goals of the class include 1) getting to know a range of poems from this period, many of them considered canonical, and developing our ability to find pleasure in their formal aspects; 2) learning about the contexts of publication in this period: how poems got published, in what formats, for what kinds of audiences, and who all was involved in that process; and 3) reconsidering public-sphere theory in relation to scholarship on early modern print culture. Mild phobias about poetics accommodated.

Winter 2008

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Poets Present Themselves: Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton
This course will focus on three epoch-making books of poems: Edmund Spenser’s Shepheardes Calender (1579), William Shakespeare’s Sonnets (1609), and John Milton’s Poems (1645). How, we will be asking, does poetry and the figure of the poet emerge in each of these books? And what specifically literary work is each book doing?

Spring 2008

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Technologies of Reading in Early Modern England
In this course we will explore technologies of reading in early modern England. In the first part of the course we will consider the materials of reading (scrolls, codices, script, print, type, glosses, indices) and ask how these materials might shape the ways readers attend to texts. We will then turn to historically specific methods of engaging with the written (humanist, Christian, literary) in order to better understand the strategies and purposes of early modern reading. We will not only discuss the work of scholars concerned with the history of the book and the history of reading (Chartier, Eisenstein, Grafton), but will also take up scholarship addressing the history of hermeneutics and exegesis (Cave, Derrida, Ricoeur). Early modern writers we will address will include Bacon, Erasmus, Luther, Marlowe, Petrarch, Shakespeare, and Spenser.


2006-2007

Fall 2006

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Milton and His Contemporaries

Winter 2007

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: English Broadside Ballads, 1500-1800
Note: Attendance in Giles Bergel’s Fall Colloquium (which meets every other week, Wed. 11-1:30 pm), titled “New Approaches to Media History and Criticism,” is highly recommended as preparation for this winter grad course described below. We will study the culture of the most published and most read of literary forms in early modern England: the broadside ballad. In the first half of the course, we will situate ballads within their historical, political, social, and aesthetic contexts. We will read a sampling of ballads of the period together with critical works about them, and consider the kinds of persons who wrote and published ballads, as well as the nature of ballad music (tunes and refrains), formal features of the ballads (woodblock images, black-letter print, meter), practices of circulation, and some recurrent themes popular in the period. In the second half of the course, we shall enter workshop mode, focusing on reading, analyzing, and mounting online transcriptions of an citations for some of the 1,857 ballads in the important Samuel Pepys collection. As part of this “hands on” approach, excursions to the UCSB library and to the Huntington library will be offered. The workshop part of the course will involve students in the Early Modern Center’s ongoing enterprise to create an unprecedented English Ballad Archive, 1500-1800, funded by the NEH, beginning with the ballads collected by Pepys. REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance and participation. 1) for students relatively new to ballad study (those who did not take my ballad course in Fall 2004: one oral report (5-10 minutes) on a group of ballads we have read for the day; 10 ballad transcriptions (or comparable work on the Pepys ballad project, such as completing full citations for 10 ballads, checking ballad transcriptions and citations, or, for the courageous, singing and recording ballad songs); and a research essay (10 pages in length). 2) for continuing students from the Fall 2004 ballad course: one oral report (5-10 minutes) on the topic of ballad culture you have been investigating (as well as a short written essay, on the subject); also, reading all the ballads in the Pepys category you have been assigned and writing another short essay about them. Essays should be 4-6 pages. The second essay may be submitted at the end of spring quarter.

Spring 2007

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: The Faerie Queene
In this course we will read Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene in its entirety. Our goal will be to attend to the ways in which Spenser’s epic is responsive both to literary tradition and to the pressing concerns of the historical moment in which it was written. Topics of discussion will include epic, romance, and genre theory; allegory and Christian hermeneutics; iconoclasm and literary form; representations of gender; erotic language and sexual desire; ethnography and the project of empire; and England’s presence in Ireland and the New World.

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Libertine Literature and Eighteenth-Century Fiction
We study and discuss a variety of works (poetry, drama, short and long fiction) relating to “libertinism,” a complex early modern cultural movement characterized by religious skepticism, resistance to political and religious authority, flouting of middle-class social conventions, disregard of moral constraint, violence against urban authority, and promotion of a varied and hedonistic sensualism (including male and female bi-sexuality), among other traits. We shall test the argument (advanced by James G. Turner) that libertinism was not a single cultural entity with different facets, but three distinct movements of thought comprising religious, philosophical, and sexual libertinism. We shall begin with Milton’s representation of sexual relations in Paradise Lost, esp books 4, 5, 8, and 9, then move on to other works of the English Restoration, including Behn’s The Fair Jilt, Wycherley’s The Country Wife, and the poems of Rochester. We shall also read English translations of the “big three” French libertine prepornographic classics, The School of Venus (1680),Venus in the Cloister (1725), and A Dialogue Between a Married Lady and a Maid (1740), as well as an important early 18c medical treatise on sexuality and venereal disease, all available in When Flesh Becomes Word (2004). The course will conclude with an exploration of libertinism in Defoe’s Roxana, Richardson’s Pamela, Fielding’s Shamela and Joseph Andrews, and Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (Fanny Hill). One ten page term paper, some in-class writing, and discussion. Reader discretion strongly advised.


2005-2006

Fall 2005

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Unread Shakespeare
We’ll begin this course by choosing eight to twelve plays and/or poems by Shakespeare that no one (or nearly no one) in the class has read. We will then spend the quarter reading and discussing the works we have chosen, saving the final week for a mini-conference on the papers you will by then be writing. In addition to the term paper, there will be very brief position papers each week on the work or works selected for that week. The premises for the course are that every one of Shakespeare’s plays and poems will reward our attention and that even an accidental collection of them will reveal valuable and interesting patterns we would otherwise not have expected. I have taught a course like this several times to undergraduates, and so far he has never let us down!

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Readings in Milton’s Poetry and Prose
A reading course in which we study, discuss, enact, and write about the major poetry and prose of John Milton in his cultural context. Readings also in selected criticism. In-class writing; 12-page term paper; final.


2004-2005

Fall 2004

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: English Broadside Ballads 1500-1800
We will study the culture of the most published and most read of literary forms in early modern England: the broadside ballad. In the first half of the course, we will situate ballads within their historical, political, social, and aesthetic contexts. We will read a sampling of ballads of the period together with critical works about them, and consider the kinds of persons who wrote and published ballads, as well as the nature of ballad music (tunes and refrains), formal features of the ballads (woodblock images, blackletter print, meter), practices of circulation, and some recurrent themes popular in the period. In the second half of the course, we shall enter workshop mode, focusing on reading, analyzing, and mounting online annotated transcriptions of some of the 1,775 ballads in the important Samuel Pepys collection. As part of this “hands on” approach, excursions to the UCSB library and to the Huntington library will be offered. The workshop part of the course will involve students in the Early Modern Center’s ongoing enterprise to create an unprecedented English Ballad Archive, 1500-1800, beginning with the ballads collected by Pepys. Assignments: Two oral and written reports on a facet of ballad culture generally and on a ballad theme in the Pepys collection (6-10 minutes; 2-3 pages each) as well as online annotated transcriptions of two Pepys ballads.


2003-2004

Fall 2003

CL 265 | The New Poetry of 16th C Spain, France, and England
In sixteenth-century Spain, France, and England, a new poetry appeared that radically and quite deliberately broke with the vernacular literary past. In Spain, this new poetry was identified most strongly with Juan Boscán and Garcilaso de la Vega. Joachim du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, and the other members of the group made famous as the “Pléiade” dominated the comparable movement in France. And in England, Philip Sidney and Edmund Spenser played a similar role. This course will examine these three movements and some of the shared conditions that shaped them, including the relation of literature to the royal court and court politics, the divided allegiance of poetry to manuscript transmission and print, the dependence of poetic reform on linguistic reform more generally, the question of appropriate metric and generic forms, the informing precedence of Greece, Rome, and especially Renaissance Italy, and the central place accorded the erotic. How, we will be asking, did this new poetry provide a cultural home in a rapidly changing world? Note on language: Students will be encouraged to use whatever relevant language skills they may have, but the course will be taught in English and all non-English texts will be available in English translation as well as in their original languages.

Winter 2004

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Home and World: A Lowly Perspective
(in EMC but also scheduled in Seminar Room, for access to the digital projector, R: 2-4:30) This will be an EMC theme course pursuing the Center’s topic for the year 2003-2004 of “Home and World.” The course will adopt the perspective of the lower and middle classes. We will look at works by and for these classes that address questions of national, economic, and domestic identity as they are defined in contestation with a spatial or conceptual “other” (ie., not home, however “home” might be defined). Works will include: ballads about apprentices, the exotic, and the home; Arden of Faversham; Shakespeare’s Merry Wives of Windsor; Thomas Deloney’s Jack of Newbury, Thomas Nashe’s The Unfortunate Traveler, Christopher Marlow’s The Jew of Malta, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice; Shakespeare’s The Tempest; Raleigh’s “Discovery of the Guiana”; and the new world seaman’s narrative, “I Miles Philips.”

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Poetry of Domesticity
We study and discuss what I call the poetry of stasis (from the Greek, “to stand”), poems relating to a place, to house and home, to tradition, stability, constancy, domesticity, community, “nature.” Many of these poems are written by women, and we’ll begin with Aemilia Lanyer’s “The Description of Cooke-ham” and read other “country house” poems by Jonson, Marvell, and Pope. We shall read the “paradise” books of Milton’s Paradise Lost (esp. 4, 5, and 8), and other poems by Dryden, Finch, Montagu, Thomson, Gray, Leapor, Carter, Blamire, Hannah More, and others. And by way of contrast we’ll also look at some poems of ekstasis (“a being put out of its place”), or ecstasy. This course was devised for the Early Modern Center “Home and the World” theme for 2003-2004.

HIST 277AB | The Human and the Other in Early Modern Europe
This course will look at animals, monsters, the disabled and other examples of the “not human” in natural philosophy as a way of defining the human in the period from about 1500-1800.

Spring 2004

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: The Rise of Novels: Nation and Empire
The modern rise of novels, into a popular form of entertainment and a type of writing that claims to be literature, is deeply implicated in the home-building and home-improvement that secures England’s distinctive national difference from the other peoples of other lands (France, the Caribbean, the Americans). But, at least since the 17th century, novel writing has also been implicated in those acts of imperial expansion through which one secures other peoples and places as part of one’s empire. This course returns to the “rise of the novel” narrative as first formulated by Ian Watt, to understand how the novel as a distinctively modern genre was shaped in its language and rhetoric to play a crucial role in both the construction of national identity (Anderson’s “imagined communities”), as well as the expansion of the British imperial project. Hawthorne’s attempt to write a distinctively American novel, out of English Puritan materials, demonstrates the flexibility of the novel as a vehicle for writing other than English identity. While we will focus our study on five major novels, written between 1740 and 1850, we will also read some of the most influential accounts of the novel from 18th and modern critics (Diderot, S. Johnson, Bakhtin, etc.). For a final paper, students may write on any appropriate novel from the Renaissance to the modern period, including modern novels where these issues are most salient, like Garcia-Marquez’s 100 Years of Solitude, Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.

1: Introduction: a brief genealogy of “rise of novel” story; nation and empire; nation versus empire
2: The imperial project at the beginnings of the national English novel: (Lafayette’s “The Princess of Monpellier” – a very short “novelle”; and referencing passages from, without a full reading of Oroonoko, and Robinson Crusoe) Criticism: Ian Watt, The Rise of the Novel; Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities
3: Richardson’s Pamela 1740: Ian Watt on the modern “self” and novel Criticism: Ian Watt; Nancy Armstrong
4: Haywood’s Fantomina 1725, Fielding’s Shamela 1741, and Fielding’s Joseph Andrews, 1742. the struggle around moralizing the novel so as to English it Criticism: Denis Diderot (Eloge a Richardson), Samuel Johnson (Rambler #4), Hippolyte Taine.
5: Fielding, Joseph Andrews, 1742; theatricality, and the novel (week 2) Criticism: Fielding (essay on character, world as theater); Bakhtin (dialogism, heteroglossia), Michael Fried (theatricality)
6: Austen, Mansfield Park, 1814: Austen harnesses the technology of “recit indirect libre” to write the “classic” novel of English identity Criticism: Ann Banfield & Dorrit Cohn on narrative; Deidre Lynch on Austen’s Englishness
7: Mansfield Park, week 2 (Guest professor: David Marshall) Criticism: David Marshall, Fanny Price and the problem of theatricality; Edward Said and the imperialism of the “domestic” novel
8: Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter. 1850 Writing a distinctively American novel through a turn to toward a romance narrative of the English Puritan origins of America Criticism: Perry Miller (American Renaissance); Lauren Berlant (National fantasy); Alexis de Tocqueville
9: The Scarlet Letter, week 2
10: open for reports

HIST 277AB | The Human and the Other in Early Modern Europe
This course will look at animals, monsters, the disabled and other examples of the “not human” in natural philosophy as a way of defining the human in the period from about 1500-1800.


2002-2003

Fall 2002

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Seventeenth Century Poetry in Print
This course will be devoted to the close examination of four great books of poems from the first half of the seventeenth century: Shakespeare’s Sonnets (1609), Donne’s Songs and Sonnets (1635), Herbert’s The Temple (1633), and Milton’s Poems (1645). As well as reading and discussing the individual poems from these books, we’ll be asking about the books themselves. How did they come to be produced? How are they organized? How does print contribute to the meaning and effect of the poems they contain?

ENGL 232 | Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: Atlantic Culture: Empire, Colonization, and Rebellion
In the past two decades, studies of the eighteenth century Britain and America have been transformed by a simple insight: nothing has had more influence upon the countries and peoples of the Atlantic periphery than the projects of colonization and empire that follow first contact with America. While these projects redirect flows of wealth, people and power, they also provoke rebellion among native peoples, slaves and colonists. To explore this terrain we will read a blend of canonical and non-canonical texts written at the cosmopolitan center (London) and the colonial peripheries (West Indies and North America).

Winter 2003

ENGL 265 | Early Modern Women Writers, 1500-1760
The course is being given in conjunction with the Early Modern Center’s theme for 2002-2003, which is early modern women’s writing. (EMC course)


2001-2002

Fall 2001

ENGL 231 | Studies in Renaissance Literature: Early Modern Visual Culture
This will be a graduate version of the undergraduate course that will require more substantive reading of primary and critical texts.


2000-2001

Fall 2000

ENGL 265 | New Worlds

Spring 2001

ENGL 0 | The Old and the New: Medieval and Renaissance Drama

ENGL 0 | New Identities: Incorporation, Inscription, and Life Stories